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Posts for tag: Heel Pain

By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
September 15, 2020
Category: Foot Issues
Common Foot and Ankle Injuries And How a Podiatrist Can HelpFoot and ankle injuries are fairly common and can happen to anyone, not just athletes. While minor strains and sprains can be nursed back to health by simply resting and icing your injury, it’s important to be able to discern when you need to see a podiatrist for care. Put your feet up and check out these signs that it might be time to schedule a podiatry appointment.

You are dealing with persistent heel pain

Heel pain is a common complaint and most often the result of an overuse injury such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. The good news is that heel pain will usually go away on its own with rest and home care; however, if the heel pain is severe or persists for weeks without getting better than it’s time to see a podiatrist and find out what’s going on.

You’re dealing with a sprained or fractured foot

If you are dealing with a new foot and ankle injury that you’ve never experienced before, then it’s a good idea to see a podiatrist who will be able to examine it to determine the extent and severity of the sprain or break. Since untreated or improperly treated injuries can lead to long-term foot and ankle pain and instability, it’s a good idea to get proper podiatry care when you sustain an injury.

You have been diagnosed with diabetes

People with diabetes know that they are also at an increased risk for other foot-related complications including neuropathy, ulcers, and infections. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes it’s a good idea to have a podiatrist that you can turn to for regular care, especially when problems arise. Even if you aren’t experiencing symptoms, you should still see your podiatrist once a year for a routine checkup.

You’re dealing with regular joint pain and stiffness

While there are many reasons why someone may deal with a bout of joint pain, if this is a persistent problem, you may be dealing with arthritis. Since arthritis is progressive, it’s important to diagnose this problem early when medications and treatments can help to slow the progression of joint damage.

If you are experiencing a foot or ankle injury or experiencing symptoms that have you concerned, it’s best to consult foot care professionals for comprehensive podiatry care.
By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
June 08, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain  

When you are dealing with chronic heel pain, it can interfere with your ability to comfortably perform daily activities. For example, the simple act of walking can be painful when you have heel pain. Further, heel pain can get worse throughout the day the more you are on your feet.

Fortunately, here at Big Sky Foot & Ankle Institute in Bozeman and Butte, MT, our knowledgeable foot doctors, Dr. Dallin Greene and Dr. Nathan Judd, can recommend specific treatment options for your heel pain.

Common Causes of Heel Pain

One of the most common causes of heel pain is a foot condition known as plantar fasciitis. Along the bottom of the foot are the plantar fascia tissues. When these tissues become inflamed and irritated, heel pain can develop. Individuals who are most likely to develop plantar fasciitis are those who routinely overpronate when walking or running. Overpronation occurs when the foot rolls inward so that the arch flattens when stepping.

Heel pain can also develop as a result of performing repetitive motions that put stress or strain on the feet. Other potential causes of heel pain include:

  • Heel spurs
  • Foot injuries
  • Stress fractures
  • Tendonitis
  • Arthritis

Treatment Options

Several options are available for treating heel pain. Minor heel pain can often be effectively treated by resting the foot, applying ice, and taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pain relievers. Another way to ease minor heel pain is to wear supportive shoes with adequate cushioning, especially in the heel area.

Severe or chronic heel pain is best treated by a podiatrist. The skilled foot doctors at our office in Bozeman and Butte, MT, can develop a treatment plan tailored to your specific needs. Some options for treating heel pain include:

  • Physical Therapy — Exercises to improve flexibility and strengthen the muscles in the feet.
     
  • Custom Orthotics — Devices placed inside the shoes to provide cushioning, stability, and arch support.
     
  • Padding and Strapping — Padding in the shoes helps minimize the impact of walking, while strapping provides support for the feet and minimizes strain on the plantar fascia tissues.
  • Night Splint — Worn while sleeping, the splint helps reduce heel pain by keeping the plantar fascia tissues in a stretched position for an extended time.
     
  • Corticosteroids — Injected into the foot to reduce inflammation and provide pain relief.
     
  • Surgery — When other treatment options have not completely resolved the issue, surgery can be performed to correct structural problems in the foot that are contributing to heel pain. Surgery is also needed to remove painful heel spurs or heel calluses.

Heel pain can be resolved with the right treatment plan developed by a podiatrist. To learn about your treatment options, schedule an appointment with Dr. Greene or Dr. Judd, our experienced foot doctors, by calling Big Sky Foot & Ankle Institute in Bozeman at (406) 206-6366 or at (406) 782-2278 for our Butte location.

By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
February 19, 2020
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Heel Pain  

Heel pain is a common foot problem that podiatrists often treat. Knowing the cause of your pain is important in determining the most effective treatment method. Even if the pain heel painseems minor, it’s amazing how much it can affect your whole body, making it difficult to get out of bed let alone go on your regular run. If you are struggling with heel pain you might be dealing with a condition known as plantar fasciitis.

What is plantar fasciitis?

The source of your pain may originate in the plantar fascia, a tough band of connective tissue that connects your toes to your feet. If the fascia becomes inflamed, you may feel pain in your heel. Of course, everything from wearing high heels to long runs can actually irritate and cause inflammation within the plantar fascia. When this happens this is known as plantar fasciitis. This condition is usually the result of overuse and repeated stress rather than an injury.

What are the symptoms of plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis causes heel pain that originates at the bottom of the heel below the heel bone. The pain may spread to the arches of the feet and may also be accompanied by stiffness. These symptoms are often exacerbated first thing in the morning or after long bouts of sitting or standing. Sometimes, light activity and exercise can momentarily lessen the pain.

How is plantar fasciitis treated?

If you know that you have plantar fasciitis (perhaps you’ve had it before) then you know it’s important to rest, avoid physical activity, and take over-the-counter pain relievers. Of course, if you’ve never experienced heel pain before it’s important to see a podiatrist to find out whether it’s plantar fasciitis or another condition such as heel spurs or Achilles tendonitis. A thorough evaluation from a medical professional is often necessary, especially if this is the first time dealing with heel pain.

Your podiatrist can also show you stretching and strengthening exercises that you can perform to help stretch the plantar fascia to reduce pain and discomfort. Some patients also choose to wear a night splint to reduce morning stiffness and arch pain.

If your symptoms aren’t being alleviated through conservative treatment methods or if you are experiencing chronic heel pain your podiatrist may recommend surgery.

If you are dealing with stubborn and painful heels turn to a podiatrist for a consultation.

By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
September 25, 2019
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Heel Pain  

If you have a sore or aching heel, find out the source and get relief. At Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute, Dr. Dallin Greene and Dr. Nathan Judd provide excellent diagnostic analysis and treatment of heel pain no matter the cause.

It could be many things...

The 26 bones and 33 joints in our feet take a lot of stress. Standing, running, jumping, injuries, and age--they change how our feet look, feel, and perform. In their Bozeman and Butte offices, your foot doctors at Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute hear many people complain of how sore their heels are. Heel pain may stem from:

  • Bone spurs, small calcified projections on the underside of the calcaneus, or heel bone
  • Very flat or very high arches
  • Obesity
  • Overuse from sports or other activities
  • Arthritis
  • Achilles tendinitis, inflammation of the large band of connective tissue running between the heel and the calf muscle
  • A deep bruise from stepping on a stone
  • Plantar fasciitis, an overstretching of the band of connective tissue between the calcaneus and the base of the toes

The most likely problem is plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain, states the American Podiatric Medical Association. How does it develop, and why does it become chronic? Usually, plantar fasciitis results from overactivity--too much and too aggressive running, jumping, dancing and so on. People notice pain upon rising, but it may increase or decrease as the day goes on.

In addition, plantar fasciitis develops if:

  • You overpronate your feet (roll toward the midline as you walk or run)
  • You are overweight
  • Shoes offer little to no support in the arches
  • Your arches are very high or very flat

What to do about heel pain

Come to Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute in Bozeman or Butte where your foot doctor will do a complete podiatric examination, including digital X-rays and gait analysis as needed. He will review your symptoms and your medical history, arriving at a treatment plan to relieve your pain and increase your foot function.

To manage plantar fasciitis, Dr. Judd or Dr. Greene may recommend:

  • More supportive footwear, particularly in the arches
  • Custom-made shoe orthotics (inserts) to correct gait issues
  • Ibuprofen to reduce inflammation
  • Stretching exercises
  • Splints (worn at night)

In cases of persistent heel pain, surgery may be needed. Many people respond well to more conservative interventions.

Contact us

Feel like your self again, and keep moving. Come to Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute for an evaluation of your heel pain from your foot doctor. You'll love the personalized treatment you receive from Dr. Judd and Dr. Greene. We have offices in Butte and Bozeman, MT. Call (406) 782-2278 for an appointment.

By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.