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Posts for: April, 2018

By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
April 17, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Varicose Veins  

Varicose veins are very easy to spot, which is why patients usually want them to disappear. They're a cosmetic issue but also a potentially painful podiatric issue that can be treated by a foot doctor. Learn what causes varicose veins and how you may be able to reduce their appearance with a podiatrist's help.

About Varicose Veins
When the veins appear to pop out of the skin on your legs, thighs and feet, they are called varicose veins. They often look blue or dark in appearance and can cause pain in the legs. This is because the veins are swelling from too much blood. It’s a problem that’s related to poor circulation and vascular health. Because the legs and feet are furthest from the heart, it’s more difficult for blood to flow back up through the body. It’s a condition that occurs most often in older women.

What Causes Them?
The Chicago Vein Institute says that about half of people over the age of 50 have varicose veins. They can develop for a number of reasons:

  • Obesity (the extra weight affects your circulation and puts stress on your legs when walking)
  • Pregnancy (again, due to the added weight)
  • Standing for long periods of times at a job
  • Heredity (patients who have two parents with varicose veins are more likely to get them)

Reducing the Appearance of Varicose Veins
Consider making your podiatrist your first line of defense when trying to treat varicose veins. Here are a few possible ways your foot doctor can help reduce the appearance of dark, swollen veins:

  • Taking an ultrasound of the legs to check the flow of blood (ensure there are no blockages)
  • Physical therapy and exercises to get the blood circulating properly
  • Prescribing orthotic device to relieve pressure on your feet when standing or walking
  • Compression stocks to reduce swelling and stimulate circulation
  • Leg massage therapy
  • Surgery in certain cases (sclerotherapy, laser and endoscopic vein surgeries are options)

Get Help from a Podiatrist
Relief from unsightly varicose veins can be found at your podiatrist’s office. Contact a foot doctor in your area to discuss treatments that will help you feel more confident in the appearance and function of the veins in your legs and feet.


By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
April 11, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Athlete's foot is a fungal infection that can infect individuals who expose their feet to moist surfaces. There are several repercussions you athlete's footcan take, according to your Butte and Bozeman, MT, foot doctors, that will help prevent or manage this foot condition.

Athlete's Foot:

Although mostly associated with athletes, athlete's foot can infect anyone. Here are some of the symptoms you may suffer from:

  • Scaly rash
  • Itching
  • Stinging and burning sensation
  • Moist, raw skin between toes

Preventative Measures:

There are several preventative measures to take according to the American Academy of Dermatology Association:

  • You should wear shower shoes, flip-flops, or sandals when near pools, and in gyms, or public showers and locker room areas. You need to also take the necessary precautions when in hotel rooms since athlete’s foot fungus may be on the floor.
  • Keep your feet clean and dry. The fungus thrives when your feet are wet and when you're wearing tight-fitted shoes. This is especially a problem when it's hot outside and your feet sweat profusely.
  • Make sure you wash your feet every day with soap and water, then completely dry them.
  • Avoid synthetic socks. Wearing socks made from natural fabrics, or fabrics that quickly dry and/or wick moisture to help keep your feet dry.
  • Change your socks when they get wet, instead of waiting for them to dry while on your feet.
  • Don't wear the same shoes every day. Give your shoes a chance to air out and dry before wearing them again.
  • Don't share towels, linens, or shoes with someone who has athlete's foot.

Athlete's foot shouldn't be a serious problem but if it takes too long to heal, you need to speak to your foot doctor. If you have any questions or concerns about athlete's foot, call your Butte and Bozeman, MT, foot doctor today!


By Big Sky Foot and Ankle Institute
April 02, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Lisfranc Fracture  

Any fracture to the foot or ankle should be taken seriously, but a Lisfranc fracture is particularly concerning for podiatrists. Because the fracture happens at the center of the foot where there are many connections, without prompt treatment this problem can significantly reduce your ability to walk or participate in athletic activities. The worse the fracture gets, the harder it is to treat. Learn more about Lisfranc fractures to see if this might be the foot problem you're experiencing.

What Is a Lisfranc Fracture?
When the bones at the center of the foot become fractured, broken or shift out of place it is called a Lisfranc injury. The ligaments that hold the bones together and cartilage at joints can also tear. This can happen when a heavy object falls on the foot, the patient has a bad fall or the foot twists unnaturally. Athletes, like soccer and football players, may be at risk for Lisfranc fractures. 

Why It’s a Concern
A Lisfranc fracture is a major concern for podiatrists because if it is allowed to go untreated for an extended period of time it can lead to a disability of the foot. It often causes the bottom of the foot to swell, bruise and become darkly discolored (a telltale sign of a Lisfranc fracture). It can also be a very painful condition that is difficult to ignore.

Lisfranc Fracture Treatments
Your foot doctor will take X-rays to confirm that you have a Lisfranc injury. If so, conservative treatments may be implemented first, including wearing a removable cast or an orthotic device that will train your bones and joints into a position for healing. In a severe case where there’s a clear fracture or severe subluxation of the bones, you may have to have foot surgery. Two common surgical solutions are fusion (healing the bones together) and internal fixation (involves the use of screws and other devices to repair the foot).

Talk to a Podiatrist
The earlier you seek treatment for a Lisfranc fracture, the better for your long-term foot health. Your podiatrist will discuss your options and come up with an ideal plan for fixing the problem. Call a foot doctor today to schedule an exam and get an official diagnosis.